Forester Lake Gold Property

Geological Setting and Mineralization


The Property is underlain by rocks of the Forester Lake Belt, at the southeastern end of the North Caribou Belt (Talbot, 1996). The Belt forms a sinuous, open 'Z' configuration with an east-southeasterly strike (see Figure below). The age of the Belt is between 2980 and 2871 Ma (Thurston et al., 1991).

The volcanic-sedimentary complex of the North Caribou belt has been folded into a syncline, with a thick clastic sedimentary core (Breaks et al., 1985). The sediments are underlain by mafic volcanic flows, which form an outer rim of the sequence.

Talbot (1996) describes the geology of the Forester Lake belt as follows:
Figure 3: Regional Geology and Position of Forester Lake property within the North Caribou Belt.
Figure 3: Regional Geology and Position of Forester Lake property within the North Caribou Belt.
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"The clastic sedimentary rocks...dominate the northern half of the Forester Lake portion of the belt (Breaks et al., 1985). These rocks include arkose, siltstone and greywacke (Hodge & Corkery, 1986). Underlying this sequence is the Forester-Neawagank Metavolcanics, consisting primarily of mafic to intermediate volcanics and intercalated clastic sediments and iron formation. Iron formation is associated with pelitic sediments occurring within the mafic volcanics. Mafic, ultramafic and felsic intrusions have also been reported (Timoshenko & Corkery, 1989). Supracrustal rocks in the Neawagank area are bounded to the SW and SE by the tonalitic North Caribou Batholith, and to the north by massive to gneissic tonalitic intrusive rocks. Like the rest of the North Caribou Greenstone Belt, the Forester Lake area has been metamorphosed to amphibolite facies and is dominated by a near E-W foliation."

The Property itself is mainly underlain by mafic volcanic flows, which lie along the southern margin of the Forester Lake Belt. Clastic sediments of the central part of the belt occur in along the northern and eastern margins of the eastern part of the property. Sulphide- and oxide-facies iron formation horizons, as well as thin clastic and chemical sedimentary beds, are intercalated with the mafic volcanics. A west-northwesterly striking mafic (quartz gabbro, diorite) intrusion cuts sediments and volcanics at the eastern end of the property. Minor felsic and mafic intrusions cut older rocks.

The volcanic package forms an anticline, the axis of which strikes northeast in the eastern part of the property and northwest in the western part. This, along with repetitions and interference folds observed in the iron formation (which are well-defined by magnetics, see Figure 5, below) suggest a structural complexity that is not well understood due to the lack of outcrop exposure over much of the property.
Figure 4: General Geology of Forester Lake Belt and eastern portion of North Caribou Belt.
Figure 4: General Geology of Forester Lake Belt and eastern portion of North Caribou Belt.
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Figure 5: Forester Lake property, airborne magnetics (after Benton Resources, 2009). A: Total Field, B: Vertical Derivative.
Figure 5: Forester Lake property, airborne magnetics (after Benton Resources, 2009). A: Total Field, B: Vertical Derivative.
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Three types of gold mineralization occur on the Property. They are briefly described below:
  • Mineralized quartz or quartz-ankerite veins hosted within shear zones or along flow or unit contacts in mafic volcanic rocks. Associated sulphide minerals include pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite;
  • Figure 6: Property Geology, Significant Mineral Occurrences and Drill Hole Intersections.
    Figure 6: Property Geology, Significant Mineral Occurrences and Drill Hole Intersections.
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  • Auriferous quartz veins associated with intersecting shear zones cutting silicified quartz gabbro or diorite in the northeastern part of the property. Mineralization is associated with small amounts of sulfides, including arsenopyrite; and
  • Gold hosted by oxide- or sulphide-facies iron formation, often associated with quartz or quartz-carbonate veining, and usually accompanied by varying amounts of pyrrhotite, pyrite, chalcopyrite and arsenopyrite (Musselwhite model).
Mineralization discovered on the property to date has been observed on isolates rock outcrops or in scattered diamond drill holes and the length, width, depth extent and overall continuity of such mineralization has not yet been determined.

Property geology, significant mineral occurrences and drill hole intersections are shown on Figure 6.